After starting PAL to generate report for 5 minutes, the physical memory of PC grows up very fast, from 10% to 99%

Sep 11, 2012 at 12:29 PM

Hi,

- Using Performance Monitor to collects system performance data, the size of “Performance Counter.blg” is about 4GB,
- Using PAL V2.3.1 to generate PAL report, on windows 7 64 bit PC
Problem:
1. After starting PAL to generate report for 5 minutes, the physical memory of PC grows up very fast, from 10% to 99%,  (Processor : Inter(R) Xeon® CPU W3690 @3.47GHz, 12.0GN RAM)
2. 30 hours past, the report was not generated yet
3. No error message display on PC command Prompt.

Please help. Thanks in advance.

Sep 11, 2012 at 12:51 PM

Wow! That is a large file to be analyzing :-). The largest I've tried to do is about 800MB and that did take hours to generate.

I would suspect it is stuck in the relog, but it may be elsewhere.

There's a log kept in the temp directory under the login that PAL is running under. You might check that and see where it is.

Did you see it start the analysis and put the green banner up at the top of the command promt screen?

Just some musings after thinking about this. Clint might have more insight than I do......

Thanks!
Ken

 

Sep 11, 2012 at 2:21 PM

Thank you very much Ken!  

Yes, I see it starts the analysis and put the green banner up at the top of the command prompt screen, even if the memory usage reaches 98%, the analysis is still ongoing, but very very slow.

I ran Performance monitor for 24 hours, and generated this 4GB file.

I can set Date/Time Range for 6 hours from 24 hours data, and generated PAL report, the time duration for generating is about 9 hours, and the memory usage reaches to 70%.

Sep 11, 2012 at 8:04 PM

How many counters did you gather?? At what frequency? what type of analysis are you doing (which template)?

 

Thanks!

ken

 

Sep 11, 2012 at 9:33 PM

Thanks Ken!

The number of counters is 90. Type of analysis is System Overview. Don’t know about frequency.

 

Thanks,

Jack

Coordinator
Sep 18, 2012 at 4:45 AM

It is likely picking up a lot of \Process(*)\* counter instances. This happens when there are a lot of short lived processes. You might want to start off with the Quick System Overview threshold file, then add each Process object counter one at a time. There might be thousands for processes coming and going. You can always run Relog.exe (command line tool part of the OS) to look at the log file and see what is in it. There is a option to generate a counter list.

Sep 18, 2012 at 11:14 AM

Thanks Clinth. I will try it. Jack